Auditing Research Topics

Auditing Research topics

Students at higher institutions of learning usually have the responsibility to choose a topic for their research project.  Every area of study has a variety of topics, and selecting a good topic requires auditing. Through auditing, you will narrow down to a topic that achieves the purpose of your project.  Although you have the freedom to pick your topic, you must relate to your instructor’s desires.

Essential Factors to consider when Auditing Research Topics

Out of the many considerations, the ones below are significant in narrowing down to a feasible research topic.

Clarity

A research topic should have a clear direction for readers to comprehend the nature of research quickly. A great research topic has one interpretation that does not distract people by having different variations. The clarity of topics also means that it determines the direction of research and sets the methodology. Achieve clarity by considering the matter from the perspective of a reader. Make the subject of your research, which allows a reader to distill the paper’s critical message and primary purpose even before reading the whole piece. Avoid very complex or uncommon topics that might require much background reading to start understanding them. You cover significant ground in your project when you have a well-defined and phrased topic.

Precision

Research starts from a broad outlook of an issue, for instance, terminal illness.  From that point, start narrowing down to specifics like “natural methods to manage terminal conditions.” You determine if your topic has depth worth perusing by getting down to specifics. The idea is to extract particular elements that add value to your academic area and make your topic more specific. For instance, if your topic is vaccination, you can be more precise by studying the “role of vaccination in pandemics.” The topic should have adequate information for your thesis, even as you want it to be precise. A research question that is too specific will get a simple answer that is close, like a yes or no. Find a topic that has pointed to support and refute a position. It creates an impressive thesis statement, gathers detailed answers, and creates a balance in a paper by focusing on different angles.

Anticipate possible answers to a research question

Think of your topics like a question and the answer that it is likely to provide.  Create a topic that allows you to generate a data-based thesis with objective evidence.  For example, the “best economy in Europe” does not give a broad thesis for an economics project. You can only give an opinion about the country you feel has the best economy and figures to support your opinion.  Instead, try a topic like “sustainable policies that help build the best economy in Europe.” The second topic has more answers and data since you must explain the contribution of each policy.

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Current importance

A paper discussion on something that does not affect current life does not inspire readers. They are unable to make a connection and feel it has no importance to life. A tutor will not award a high grade if your topic does not impact the current state of knowledge. Find a topic on something that your audience notices every day.  A topic on e-commerce makes more sense to the current generation than a subject on barter trade that was taking place centuries ago.  Make the topic unique even if you want it to be current to avoid writing on something that many have been covering. Many people will already have read about it, so find a unique angle.  For example, there is much information on the advantages of e-commerce.  You can improve on the topic to be “if e-commerce prevents buyer and seller interaction.”

Keep the length of your assignment, due date, and required sources in mind as you use the factors above when auditing research topics. 

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